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How to Replace a Character Model
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pavarini
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 PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2016 1:57 pm    Post subject: How to Replace a Character Model Reply with quote Back to top

This tutorial will help you create custom characters for GE. This same process can be used to replace any model in GE. For this tutorial I will assume you have moderate knowledge of rigging and model hierarchy.

You will need the following tools...
    A 3D package that can import/export FBX 2014.1/v6.1.0 (I will be using XSI for this tutorial)
    GoldenEye Editor (beta version required)
    obj2an8
    FBX SDK 2014.1
    PixelFormer for converting textures
    A scratchpad folder used for this tutorial. We will save save our ROM, model and textures in this directory.
It is recommended that you install these programs as Administrator or writing privilege will be limited.

How to setup the editor for model editing
1) Download and install the editor.
2) Run the BetaGrabberTool.exe file located within the editor directory (C:\Program Files (x86)\GEEdit3\) and download the latest version.
3) Download obj2an8 and extract objtoan8.zip\bin\(x86 or x64)\ObjToAn8.exe. Copy ObjToAn8.exe to the editor directory. It is important that you select the correct bit version that matches your operating system.
4) Download the FBX SDK and install. Open the folder C:\Program Files\Autodesk\FBX\FBX SDK\2014.1\lib\vs2008\(x86 or x64)\ and copy libfbxsdk.dll to the editor directory. It is important that you select the correct bit version that matches your operating system.
5) Run the editor and open the Tools>Preferences window. Set the location for ObjToAn8.exe (which should be C:\Program Files (x86)\GEEdit3\ObjToAn8.exe) and click OK.
6) Extract PixelFormer (orUSXqI.zip) to any location

How to import textures for GE
Before we jump in, it is important to ensure your model is ready for GE. The N64 was notorious for its limited texture space, developers often had to partition textures just to get them to fit, sometimes using different compression formats on the same model. If your model has textures that go beyond the limits below then you will need to partition/resize your textures (I suggest doing this before we continue the tutorial).
    4-bit Greyscale = 64x64
    4-bit 16 Color = 64x32
    8-bit 256 Color = 32x32
    For looping textures, resolution must be a power of two
    Filesize limit is 4KB 0x1000 for grayscale and 2KB 0x800 for color (use the image editor to check the size)
    Editor will only accept bmp format (use PixelFormer to convert)
    Textures per model should be under 40 (above is not stable)

    You can find more information about N64 textures in this thread: N64 Textures and TMEM
1) Create a new folder in our tutorial directory that we created at the start, name it textures. This is where we will store the converted bmp files.
2) Open PixelFormer and drag in each texture file. Click File>Export and save the texture as a bmp with R8:G8:B8 encoding. If you do not see this save option then you need to convert to a palette, which can be done by going to Image>Properties and selecting 256-color-palette.
3) Repeat until you've converted all your textures to 24 bpp bmps.
4) Open up the editor and click Tools>Image Tools. We will be adding our textures to the end of the ROM so scroll to the bottom.
5) Add your textures by clicking "Add Color Image to END of ROM" (if your texture is grayscale use the grayscale button instead). Repeat until you've added all character textures.
6) One last step before we save the ROM, all face textures must have mipmapping disabled. Right click each face texture and click Set # Mipmap Levels. Set it to 0.
7) Click "Write New ROM with Changes" and save the ROM into our tutorial folder we created at the start.
8) Before we close the Image Editor window we need to create a file called textures.txt. This is a file which informs the editor what textures to use for our model.

How to write a textures.txt file
With the Image Editor is still open, click on your first imported texture. If you look closely at the bottom of the window you'll see some detailed information about our texture, such as colors, encoding method and size. What we're looking for is the preset number for our texture. Every texture has an unique ID representing the location inside the ROM. When we import models into the editor it will ask for a textures.txt file. The txt file contains a list of texture IDs and their equivalent filenames. Without the textures.txt file the editor will not know what textures to use for our model.
1) Create a new folder in our tutorial directory called 'release'. This is where we will place all the files the editor needs to import our model. Create a new text file called textures.txt inside release, then open it with your preferred text editor.
2) Click on your texture, copy the preset number and paste it into the textures.txt file.
3) Add a space and then copy and paste your texture filename, make a new line (Note: use the original texture filename, not the converted bmp texture).
4) Repeat steps 2 and 3 until you've added all the textures to the text file. Save it into our tutorial folder. Your textures.txt file should look like the code below.
Code:
0A8A Skin.png
0A8B Eyes.png
0A8C Hair.png
0A8D Face.png
0A8E Pants.png
0A8F Shoes.png

5) We're done with the Image Editor, close the window and now click Tools>Preferences and click "Quick Convert (F5) ROM: Choose ROM". Pick the ROM we saved in our tutorial folder. Click OK.

How to export a model from the editor
We'll be exporting a character from GE in FBX format. Create a new folder in our tutorial directory and name it ouromov.
1) Open the editor.
2) Click Tools>Model Editor and wait for this to finishing loading. This is the window we'll be working with.
3) For the tutorial we'll be replacing Ouromov's character model. Click the guard list and find "07 CouromovZ (Ouromov)" and select him. Hit Edit to load the model ready for editing.
4) Click the button titled "Export Whole obj" and change the save type to FBX Format. Save it into the ouromov folder.
This is the part where we switch over to our 3D package. I'll be using XSI but you can use any software as the process is the same regardless of what you use. If you are using XSI and get stuck with some steps, you can watch some tutorials here.

How to prepare a model for rigging in XSI
Up until this point we have assumed the following: you have a model, its in a t-pose, its rigging has been removed (basically a static mesh), its made up of triangles (no quads!), its not entirely made up of edge polygons (make sure most of your polys are joining or rigging is very difficult), is less than 1000 polys and you've added the textures into the ROM. For comparison, a GE character model is around 500-400 triangles.
There are some limitation with GE model format. You cannot have transparent vertices because the alpha channel is reserved for the blood effect. This also applies for secondary rooms. Models can have decals but it's a little tricky to setup. I'll cover this later in the tutorial.
Note about Scale: All GE/PD models adhere to the internal scale set by Rare. 1000 units = 1 meter. If this is too large for your software package resize them on import and remember to export your character with the proper scale.
1) Open a new scene and import your character and Ouromov (Guard0007.fbx). If your character is tall or short, export Jaws/Oddjob from the editor and refer to those characters instead for the rest of the tutorial.
2) You may have noticed that when we imported Ouromov, we also imported the low detailed parts as well. Open up the Explorer, selecting parts 42 - 4F and hide them.
3) Set Ouromov to a t-Pose by rotating joint 10 z axis to 90* and joint 11 z axis to -90*
4) Open the schematic window, select your model's top node in the hierarchy and scale up to Ouromov. Match the scale of Ouromov and ensure that the hips perfectly overlap eachother. The arm lengths should be roughly the same length with the reference character you imported (more on this below). When you're happy with the scale of your character continue to the next step.
5) Both models should be in a perfect t-pose, ready to move our character onto the GE rig. In the schematic window, middle click Ouromov and duplicate him.
6) In the schematic window, select the new duplicate's polymeshes and delete them so only the rig is left.
7) In the schematic window, middle click the original Ouromov (Guard0007.fbx) and hide him. We'll only be needing him for references, for now we will be focusing on rigging our character's polymesh to the GE rig.
8) In the schematic window, select the duplicate's top node and rename it to your character's name by pressing F2. Once you've renamed the node, reselect the node, click parent and select our character's polymeshes and right click. This will make the polymeshes a child of the node. Next, select your character's polymesh again and click Transform>Set Neutral Pose. This sets the default transform and scale for our polymeshes.

How to rig your model in XSI
Before we continue let's talk about GE rigs, their hierarchy and how GE displays models. GE rigs are made up of 15 joints. The hierarchy is as follows
Code:
     TopJoint (ignore this joint)
        |
       Hip
    /       \
 Thighs     Waist
   |       /     \
 Knees  Head  Shoulders
   |              |
 Ankles         Elbows
                  |
                Wrists

A character's height is defined by the length of the legs. Providing you place these joints correctly your character will stand at the correct height, but if your model is clipping into the ground or floating you can manually change the character's ground offset position in 21990 Settings (I will cover this later in the tutorial). It's best to do any modifications now to your model before we cut it up into pieces and rig it.
Note: GE rigs don't need to be perfectly symmetrical to work, even GE's rigs were slightly off.
1) Before we rig the character we will go through a list of joints and the way they are used in default GE characters. This will help you place the joints so your character animate the same as the default characters. If you're not sure how a model is suppose to be rigged up just refer to the GE character we imported.2) Starting from the waist/thighs, grab each joint and move them to the appropriate place in your character. You won't know if you've placed it correctly until you have enveloped your character, so don't worry if it isn't perfectly placed.

How to divide a model into parts in XSI
Before we slice up our model we need to discuss what makes up models in GE. Character models are usually made up of 16 hi res parts and 11 low res parts. These parts are swapped out in realtime depending on the distance triggers in the model. The parts also serve as hitboxes for our model.
Viewing Ouromov's hierarchy, we can see the low res parts. All polymeshes exported from the editor are named 'Room##_primary'. High res parts start at 00 and low res parts start at 40 (these numbers are hex). What we want to do is divide our model into the same amount of parts as Ouromov has. We will also create low poly textured cubes that will be serve as our low res parts. This is a list of polymesh names to their body parts.
    Room01_primary: Left Foot
    Room02_primary: Left Shin
    Room03_primary: Left Thigh
    Room04_primary: Right Foot
    Room05_primary: Right Shin
    Room06_primary: Right Thigh
    Room07_primary: Hips
    Room08_primary: Head
    Room09_primary: Left Hand
    Room0A_primary: Left Forearm
    Room0B_primary: Left Upper arm
    Room0C_primary: Right Hand
    Room0D_primary: Right Forearm
    Room0E_primary: Right Upper arm
    Room0F_primary: Waist+Chest
    Room88_primary: Neck
Note: Much of this guide is assuming your model is made up of a single polymesh, but if your model is already split into parts then you need to merge them into large chunks for GE. You can do this by selecting the polygons, click Poly.Mesh>Merge, tweak the tolerance to remove the edges (while preventing poly bleed) and click Merge then Delete.
To extract polys from a single polymesh in XSI you need to
1) Select the polymesh, then change selection filter to polygon.
2) Select the polys you wish to extract from your polymesh. It's best to select all the polys between joints for each room. Note: default rectangle selection will select all polygons behind, if you don't want this switch to rectangle raycast (found under Select>Tools).
3) Right click and click "Extract Polygons (delete)"
4) If you are asked to "Remove overlap from clusters" click yes.
5) Open the schematic window and rename polymsh_detached to the appropriate polymesh name listed above. Parent it to your new model's node.
6) Repeat this for all the parts required for GE. If at any point you are not sure where to extract a poly just reference Ouromov.

How to envelope a model in XSI
Now it is time to bind our polymesh to the rig by enveloping it. Each vertex must be binded to a weight or it will not animate. Joints must be 100% absolute so double check the rigging by opening the weight editor and checking over each joint. The brush by default has a soft falloff so we need to change that as well, open the Brush Property (Ctrl+W) and set opacity and hardness to 100%, and softness to 0%.
The list below is what each room is connected to. Follow this as you add an envelope to each room polymesh. Don't be afraid to add extra joint envelopes to your rooms if they need so, after all your model may be of a different artstyle and could benefit from extra joints. If you're not sure how to envelope a part, refer to the GE model's envelopes.
    Room01_primary / Left Foot: 14 (Deforms)
    Room02_primary / Left Shin: 14 joining Foot, 12 joining Thigh (Deforms)
    Room03_primary / Left Thigh: 12 joining Shin, 10 for Thigh, 1 joining Hips (Deforms)
    Room04_primary / Right Foot: 15
    Room05_primary / Right Shin: 15 joining Foot, 13 joining Thigh
    Room06_primary / Right Thigh: 13 joining Shin, 11 for Thigh, 1 joining Hips
    Room07_primary / Hips: Only 1 (add 11 and 10 if mesh is open bottom, e.g skirt)
    Room08_primary / Head: Only 3
    Room09_primary / Left Hand: Only 8 (Deforms)
    Room0A_primary / Left Forearm: 8 joining Hand, 6 joining Upper arm (Deforms)
    Room0B_primary / Left Upper arm: 6 joining Forearm, 4 for Upper Arm, 2 joining Chest (Deforms)
    Room0C_primary / Right Hand: Only 9
    Room0D_primary / Right Forearm: 9 joining Hand, 7 joining Upper arm
    Room0E_primary / Right Upper arm: 7 joining Forearm, 5 for Upper Arm, 2 joining Chest
    Room0F_primary / Waist+Chest: 2 for Chest, 1 joining Hips (Deforms)
    Room88_primary / Neck: 3 joining Head, 2 joining Chest (Deforms)
1) Set the toolbar to Animate toolbar and have your schematic window open. Set the Construction Mode to Animation.
2) Select a polymesh. Click Envelope>Set Envelope and select the rig joints associated to the polymesh from above. Right click to set the envelopes. Set the number of skeleton objects to 1 and close the window.
3) Repeat step 2 until all rooms have envelopes.
4) Now it's time to fine tune our weights. While setting the envelopes XSI automatically binds vertices to the nearest joint. We will need to manually fix these.
5) Open the Weight Paint Panel (bottom left of interface) and turn on absolute painting mode. Set Deformer Weight to 100%. Select a polymesh and it will automatically list the joints you can paint with. Pressing W in the preview window will change our cursor to a weight paint tool. Holding down middle mouse button will change the size of the brush. You can color vertices the same way in XSI by pressing Shift+W. Ctrl+W brings up the weight/color painting property panel.
6) Paint each polymesh to follow that of the above list. Each part has to deform the same way as the GE model or the animations will not sync.
Note about realigning joints: If you want to move a joint after you've applied an envelope, select the node and move it. Once you're happy with the placement click Envelope>Set Reference Poses. This will move the polymesh back to their original location with the new joint placement. If there are multiple joints controlling the polymesh then you will also need to Set Reference Poses for those joints too. This should only be applied on joints that have not been rotated or it will apply the rotation offsets to the polymesh and ruin the t-pose.
Note about adding extra joints to polymesh: Select your polymesh, click Envelope>Set Envelope and select the extra joint you want to add and right click (do not enable Automatically Reassign Envelope or you will need to repaint your weights). Your new joint will be listed in the Weight Paint Panel along with the previous joints.


How to create low poly models in XSI
So you're happy with the weights and have cross referenced with the GE character we imported at the beginning. Great, now it is time to create our low poly body parts. As said above, these are swapped with the high res parts when you cross over a predefined distance. You can skip this step and delete the distance triggers, but you will bog down the frame rate if there is multiple characters on screen. Like the lists above the low res parts are numbered in the same format, but there is one difference.
    Room42_primary / Left Shin: Joint 12
    Room43_primary / Left Thigh: Joint 10
    Room45_primary / Right Shin: Joint 13
    Room46_primary / Right Thigh: Joint 11
    Room47_primary / Hips: Joint 1
    Room48_primary / Head: Joint 3
    Room4A_primary / Left Forearm: Joint 6
    Room4B_primary / Left Upper arm: Joint 4
    Room4D_primary / Right Forearm: Joint 7
    Room4E_primary / Right Upper arm: Joint 5
    Room4F_primary / Waist+Chest: Joint 2
You might have noticed that there are no low res hands or feet, that is because GE models already feature very low poly hands and feet so Rare didn't bother creating distance triggers for them. You can make some low poly hands/feet but you will need to create new distance triggers and display lists for the model before you import the new character. I recommend not doing this until you've completed the tutorial and have experimented with the model editor first.
For performance reasons Rare only assigned one joint max for the low res parts, I strongly recommended to do the same for your parts. The total poly count should be 150 tris or lower.
1) Set the Construction Mode to Modeling and set the toolbar to Model toolbar.
2) Click Get>Primitive>Polygon Mesh>Cube
3) Adjust the length value until it roughly fits the hi res part you're matching (400 is a good number to start at).
4) In the schematic view, parent your cube polymesh to your model's top node. Select the cube and rename it to the name above.
5) Reselect your cube polymesh and set select filter to point.
6) Move each point to roughly cover the volume of the hi res part. You can use Snap to Point to help speed up this process, hold down CTRL while moving a vertex (and turn on Snap>Target Points>Points). Continue to the next step when you've roughly covered the volume and placement of the hi res part.
7) Let's apply a texture to our low res part, set the toolbar to Render and click Get>Texture>Image. With the new window click New>New from File. Select one of the textures that is currently being used on your model (do not use the converted bmp textures, the editor will not recognize it during FBX import). To see thumbnail view click the movie clapper on the top right of the file explorer.
8) Our cube has no UV data so we need to select a method. Under texture projection click New then any method. For low res parts I recommend Cylindrical but it can be anything you want. There should be a green hoop around our model, you can adjust this by moving and rotating around. If you want to change the projection method select the low poly part and press enter, then change projection method.
9) Once you're happy with the low res part, click Modify>Poly.Mesh>Triangulate. Then click Freeze M to freeze all polymesh changes.
10) Set the toolbar to Animate toolbar and set the Construction Mode to Animation.
11) With the schematic window open select your low res part and click Envelope>Set Envelope, then select the rig joints associated to the polymesh from the list above. Right click to set the envelopes. Set the number of skeleton objects to 1 and close the window.
12) Repeat steps 1 to 11 until all parts have been converted.
12) So you should have parts 42 43 45 46 47 48 4A 4B 4D 4E 4F completed. While the above process will not look good for faces and other detailed parts, it's good enough to grasp the process behind creating low detailed parts. Once you've completed the tutorial I recommend manually UV each parts for better LOD transitions and using higher polygon parts when needed (but try to target about 150-200 triangles total).

How to export our model from XSI
1) Using the schematic window, select all the children of your model's top node (all polymesh and joints).
2) Click File>Export>Export FBX and save it into the release folder we made back in the textures.txt step. Make sure the selection only option is checked.
3) You can close XSI, but I recommend to keep it open if you need to revise some texturing or weights.
4) Go to your model's directory, copy all the textures and paste them into the release folder along with our model and textures.txt. (Note: You must copy the original model textures, not the converted bmp textures).
5) Now it is time to switch to the editor to import our model.

How to import a model into GE
Note: If you have the model editor window still open skip to step 5.
1) Open the editor.
2) Click Tools>Model Editor and wait for this to finishing loading. This is the window we'll be working with.
3) Click choose ROM and select the ROM we saved back when we imported our textures. If you've set the Quick Convert ROM then you can ignore this step.
4) For the tutorial we'll be replacing Ouromov's character model. Click the guard list and find "07 CouromovZ (Ouromov)" and select him. Hit Edit to load the model ready for replacing.
5) Click the 'Import Whole OBJ if already added textures' button, select the textures.txt file and click open, then select our FBX model and click open.
6) If there is an error message relating to weight maps then you will need to go back to XSI and fix up the weight. Remember they must be 100% absolute or the editor will not envelope the effected vertices.
7) If there is a texture error message then check to see if the not found texture is located inside the release folder. Also make sure that the texture filename has been referenced inside textures.txt.
8) If all went well our character should have replaced every part of Ouromov, but there will still be some referenced textures that need replacing. Click the 'Textures from Model' button and it will now include our new textures into the model's header. This is so when the engine loads the model it will know which textures to load, if you don't do this it will pause the game while the engine seeks our textures.
9) For GE, collision and hitboxes need to be preprocessed for each model. This is so when you shoot your character the blood effect will appear in the correct place, click the 'Recalculate Collision Unique Points' button.
10) For the final step click the 'Delete Debug Data' button. This will remove any unused junk left over from the development process of the game to make room for our new model.
11) Click 'Inject into ROM and Update' and save it to your ROM directory, ready to play. For PJ64 you will need to copy over the GE settings for this new ROM, as it will not be located inside the ROM settings database. If you use 1964 this step is not required as the settings are generated on new ROMs.

How to change our character's height and gender in GE
Note: I recommend to first test your character in-game before continuing so you know how much of a value difference you need to make to ground offset.
1) On the Editor's main window click Tools>Game Configuration. Wait for the window to decode GE's 21990 file, this will take a minute or two.
2) Click choose ROM and select the ROM we saved back when we exported our model. If you've set the Quick Convert ROM then you can ignore this step. If you want to adjust the model after editing 21990 settings you will need to reload the ROM within the Model Editor.
3) Click the Model Details tab and look for the menu item box called Guard #. Click and select 0007 CorumovZ.
4) Change your character's gender by toggling the Male checkbox. Set scale to 1.0.
5) Change your character's height offset by modifying the Ground Offset value.
6) Click the 'Write ROM with 21990 Mods' button and launch your emulator (don't forget to copy over the GE settings).
7) Repeat steps 4 and 5 until the feet are just above clipping into the around. I suggest testing in multiplayer as you can see the character's height quicker than playing through Facility.
8) You can adjust the character's POV height under the multiplayer tab. It's best to do this step once you've got the ground offset locked down. Select Ouromov (04) and change POV to the same value that you set Ground Offset to. Save the ROM and test in MP.
9) Make adjustments to the POV and save the ROM. The POV height should be level to your character's eyes when you zoom into the back of the head in MP. Another method is to shoot very close to a wall. The bullets should be appearing right in front of the eyes like in this picture. This is how all the GE characters are aligned.
10) When you've aligned the POV height, save the ROM to your tutorial folder as custommodel.rom. You can share the ROM by clicking Tools>XDelta Patching>Generate GoldenEye XDelta Patch. Select the original ROM (GoldenEye 007 (U) [!].z64) and then select custommodel.rom. Save the xdelta patch in the tutorial folder as model.xdelta. This xdelta patch can be used to share your models with other users or upload to goldeneyevault.com.

Congratulations you've completed this tutorial. If you have any questions or improvements please post in this thread. Feel free to share pics of your custom models in this thread.


INCOMPLETE UNTIL THIS POINT - STILL LEARNING HOW TO DO THIS STEP

How to create decals in XSI

How to add environmental mapping in XSI

How to bake lighting to vertex in XSI

How to modify rigs in the model editor


Last edited by pavarini on Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:09 pm; edited 95 times in total
 
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pavarini
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 PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

I apologize for taking so long with the tutorial. I'm still new to XSI when it comes to modeling.

This is one of the characters I imported today. The model is special as the shading was created by baking light onto the vertex colors by raytracing defused lights. I will briefly cover this in the tutorial. The same process also works for maps.




Last edited by pavarini on Mon Jan 16, 2017 2:44 pm; edited 2 times in total
 
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mistamontiel
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 PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2017 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Duuuude that Linky animates so perfectly !!! Shocked

Hm , the Wayback Machine link says vid's not archived . Vid still up , not sure why I can't unmute it though ..
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pavarini
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 PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2017 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Thanks, I've replaced the video to show off the newer shaded model.
 
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Sogun
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 PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2017 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Thank you very much for this tutorial, pavarini. Very Happy
I think I'll try something myself this weekend.
 
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 PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2017 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Haha, I had wondered about Mario from SM64, but Adult Link is another fantastic character choice! Very Happy
 
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 PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Wait. You can animate textures (the eyes blinking) ?
Does that really work inside the game and how would you set up that ?
 
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pavarini
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 PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

No, that was something I setup within XSI. It was rendered using mental ray. It's quite possible to setup eye blinking using an extra joint, but this would require modifying every animation or the model will crash the game. Or you could use the model for cutscenes and only playback special animations with an extra joint.
 
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

After finding a higher quality model of Link I decided to redo the model following my own tutorial steps. He has his earrings and a reflective polygon on his right glove. This is to test the FBX importing feature SubDrag has been working on for the past year. Importing this model into the editor required minimal touch ups in the visual editor. Here is Link in multiplayer.


The tutorial has been completed. It can be used to import models and characters, the process is a little different for PD but it's basically the same. If you have issues following the tutorial please post in this thread.
 
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

That's pretty awesome. The video won't play for me, for whatever reason. But the pics look great. I'd really like to see Mario from Super Mario 64, as well. They would be fun additions to either GoldenEye or Perfect Dark.
 
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Amazing as always, pavarini!

Is that Link's hi-poly model from Ocarina of Time. How many polygons is it? And how many textures?
 
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Thank you very much for that tutorial. Obviously it required a huge amount of work to do.
 
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Thanks for the kind works, but it wouldn't have been possible without SubDrag. He has put in a lot of work to support FBX. If you skip the environmental reflections and hitbox optimization, there is zero tweaks done within the visual editor.

Yes that is Link but ripped from WarioWare: Smooth Moves. I was unable to find a higher quality model rip. Link uses 818 triangles with 23 textures. The low res parts are 370 triangles.


Last edited by pavarini on Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:30 am; edited 1 time in total
 
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Johnny Thunder
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Link? what happend with Captain Falcon or Ganondorf?
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pavarini
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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Johnny Thunder wrote:
Link? what happend with Captain Falcon or Ganondorf?

Link was used as a test for the tutorial. You can import any character if the model is within reasonable limits.
 
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